WHAT OF THE HIDDEN VICTIMS OF N-BOMBS? THE WORKERS
The Buffalo News on 09/08/95

In the news stories concerning the 50th anniversary of the dropping of the bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, something was missing. What of the health of thousands who worked with the radioactive materials used in making these bombs?

Nuclear materials have been on site at Linde in Tonawanda for the last 50 years. The Department of Energy has finally agreed to start the cleanup at Linde/Praxair with a $14 million "interim" cleanup that only scratches the surface at the site (approximately 10 per cent of the total contamination). There's also the issue of contamination at the Town of Tonawanda landfill, the Seaway landfill and at Ashland land sites.

The Energy Department wants to decontaminate Buildings 14, 30 and 31 and demolish Building 38 at the Linde/Praxair work site. All of these buildings were in use through the 1980s and Building 14 is still in use. What of the plight of those who worked in these buildings day after day, week in, week out, year in, year out?

It's tough to count the coffins of our "work family" members, when putting them to their final rest after excruciating bouts with cancer.

It leads us to disagree with those who say there's no problem. It makes one disagree even more to study the works of specialists in the field of low-level radiation and its relation to cancers, such as Drs. Thomas Mancuso, Alice Stewart, Diane Quigley, John Gofman and Arjun Makhijani. When mentioning these experts to the Energy Department, they're not familiar with their names or their studies.

DON FINCH
Kenmore

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